Tag Archives: Physical Therapy

Elbow Pain and Problems

The elbow is a hinge joint between the lower end of the humerus bone in the upper arm and the upper end of the radius and ulnar bones in the lower arm. The arm is bent and rotated at the elbow by the biceps muscles in the upper arm. Ligaments located at the front, back, and sides of the elbow help stabilize the joint.

Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis. This is inflammation and injury to the tendons, which are soft tissues that attach muscle to bone.

Lateral Elbow Pain: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Use of the upper limb in sport demands a well functioning elbow. In addition, injuries in this region may interfere with the patient’s everyday activities. The clinical approach to elbow pain is considered under the following headings:

  • Lateral Elbow Pain, with a particular focus on
  • Extensor Tendinopathy
  • Medial Elbow Pain
  • Posterior Elbow Pain
  • Acute Elbow Injuries
  • Forearm Pain
  • Upper Arm Pain.

Lateral Elbow Pain

Lateral elbow pain is an extremely common presentation among sportspeople and manual workers. The most common cause is an overuse syndrome related to excessive wrist extension. This condition has traditionally been known as ‘tennis elbow’. This is an unsatisfactory term as it gives little indication of the pathological processes involved. In fact, the condition is more common in non-tennis players than in tennis players. It has also been referred to as ‘lateral epicondylitis’. This is also inappropriate as the site of the abnormality is usually just below the lateral epicondyle and the primary pathology is due to collagen disarray rather than inflammation.

The primary pathological process involved in this condition is tendinosis of the extensor carpiradials brevis (ECRB) tendon, usually within 1-2 cm of its attachment to the common extensor origin at the lateral epicondyle. This condition will be referred to as extensor tendinopathy.

Other conditions that may cause lateral elbow pain include synovitis of the radio humeral joint, radiohumeral bursitis and entrapment of the posterior interosseous branch of the radial nerve (radial tunnel syndrome). These conditions may exist by themselves or in conjunction with extensor tendinopathy.

There is often a contribution to lateral elbow pain from the cervical and upper thoracic spines and neural structures. This may be a relatively minor contribution or, in some cases, the main cause of the patients elbow pain. A full assessment of the cervical spine and neural structures is essential in examination of the patient with lateral elbow pain.

History

The characteristics of the patients lateral elbow pain should be elicited. The diffuse pain of extensor tendinopathy typically radiates from the lateral epicondyle into the proximal forearm extensor muscle mass. Occasionally the pain may be more localized. The onset of pain may be either acute or insidious. There may have been recent changes in training or technique, note-taking or equipment used in sport or work.

The severity of pain ranges from relatively trivial pain to an almost incapacitating pain that may keep the patient awake at night. It is important to note whether the pain is aggravated by relatively minor everyday activities, such as picking up a cup, or whether it requires repeated activity, such as playing tennis or bricklaying, to become painful.

Pain may radiate into the lateral aspect of the forearm. This may be consistent with posterior interosseous nerve entrapment or irritation of other neural structures. If pain is closely related to the activity level, it is more likely to be of a mechanical origin. If pain is persistent, unpredictable or related to posture, referred pain should be considered.

Certain movements, usually those involving wrist extension or gripping, will aggravate mechanical pain. Referred pain is affected by prolonged posture, such as lengthy periods seated at a desk or in a car. Associated sensory symptoms, such as pins and needles, may indicate a neural component. Presence of neck, upper thoracic or shoulder pain should also be noted.

Often by the time the patient presents to the sports medicine clinician, he or she will already have undergone a variety of treatments. It is important to note the response to each of these treatments.

An activity history should also be taken, noting any recent change in the level of activity. In tennis players, note any change in racquet size, grip size or string tension and whether or not any comment has been made regarding his or her technique.

Extensor tendinopathy

For this major sports medicine condition, we review the pathology, outline the clinical presentation, and then discuss evidence based and clinically founded treatment.

Clinical Features

Extensor tendinopathy occurs in association with any activity involving repeated wrist extension against resistance. This includes sporting activities, such as tennis ,squash and badminton, as well as occupational and leisure activities, such as carpentry, bricklaying, sewing and knitting. Computer use has been shown to be associated with the development of this condition. The peak incidence is between the ages of 40 and 50 years but this condition may affect any age group.

There are two distinct clinical presentations of this condition. The most common is an insidious onset of pain, which occurs 24-72 hours after unaccustomed activity involving repeated wrist extension. This occurs typically after a person spends the weekend laying bricks or using a screwdriver. It is also seen after prolonged sewing or knitting .In the tennis player, it may occur after the use of a new racquet, playing with wet, heavy balls or over hitting, especially hitting into the wind. It also occurs when the player is hitting ‘late’(getting the position slowly), so that body weight is not transferred correctly and the player relies on the forearm muscles exclusively for power.

Treatment

No single treatment has proven to be totally effective in the treatment of this condition. A combination of the different treatments mentioned below will result in resolution of the symptoms in nearly all cases.

The basic principles of treatment of soft tissues injuries apply. There must be control of pain, encouragement of the healing process, restoration of flexibility and strength, treatment of associated factors (e.g. increased neural tension, referred pain),gradual return to activity with added support and correction of the predisposing factors.

Control of Pain

It remains unclear as to how much pain is ideal in the treatment of tendinopathies. Clinical experience suggests that a low level of pain, which does not worsen with training, is likely to not be harmful for tendon healing. However, some patients require relative rest, application of ice and analgesia for comfort.

HOW TO GET BACK TO RUNNING AFTER BACK PAIN?

 

Running is arguably the most basic form of exercise. Runners face many challenges in their life, they get hurt,stay busy and tired. Back pain is very common nowadays not only for runners or athletes, 70% of the population has been facing the same issue. They go to the doctor’s clinic and miss their official and routine work. Sports injuries are also another concept to consider the back pain from muscle aching to a shooting, burning or stabbing sensation. Most back pains gradually improve with home treatment and self care. Repeated heavy lifting or sudden awkward movement cause muscle or ligament strain and spasms. Osteoarthritis can affect lower back pain. Pain can be acute, sub acute or chronic under the categories of muscles, bones, lower back, buttocks and specific sensation is sharp, electric, burning type pain that can originate from any part of the body. When an injury at some point extended break at your movements due to pain but there is good news your muscles have a memory of those past activities. A few things are common if you want to run after acute or chronic back pain. Start with your own unique challenges and requirements to help your body. To get back to running after a long interval follow some important steps:-

Understand The Cause

Whenever a long interval enters in any kind of activity it is difficult to start from the point you left and there must be a cause that why a person left that from schedule. In the case of a runner Runner spine’s vertebrae and discs experience extra pressure, lower back pain due to bending or lifting in high frequency. At the same time, to get back to your recovery track, you should go to the doctor to diagnose why you have back pain. You don’t need any scans if you are going through a short term of pain but if you have a sudden injury you should take your extra care for diagnosing the reason. After this process the doctor will arrange a PT for you, to skip the doctor you can go to the Physical Therapy, A skilled Physical Therapist will be able to access you and provide you with diagnosis and treatment plan. Developing muscle strength and aerobic capacity at rehab will help to reschedule your elapsed exertion.

 Don’t let your Injury keep you Down

When you are suffering from an acute back injury, take a rest for a couple of days after bending, twisting or straining. Don’t rest too much time after injury because the more time you take to get comfortable, the more it will feel hard to come back. At the prior times of injury more chances are there to function properly within a week or 2 weeks. In fact unused muscles switch themselves off. For that reason, start walking by the wall as your pain decreases, begin normal and slow movements such as walking around the house, and start slow and regular exercise. Listen to your body if you are feeling any tenderness, communicate with your Physical Therapist who can alleviate pain and regain function. They must focus on the exercises and stretches designed for you in PT sessions.

 Celebrate Each Step

Start counting your progress day by day, try warming up under your Healthcare’s treatment plan. A Physical Therapist will also identify your weak points so that he/she can analyse where to give stress and rest so you can handle the pain with comfort. If you have any impact on joints, PT will schedule not only running but runs with biking, swimming which will make cardiovascular endurance without stressing your joints. Sometimes the runners get frustrated as one who was running 40- 50 miles per week is not able to walk around. Be positive, your positive emotions reinforce you to get back in action. Commit yourself to join body strength training sessions in the Rehab Center. Measure day by day progress and praise yourself. Self care works more than healthcare. Your encouragement to yourself will help to design your new road map of success.

 Have Patience

Casual Runners or Professional Athletes always want to run as soon as possible. No one is happy by sitting during an injury. Don’t be scared and do not increase your weekly mileage by more than 10% in order to help your body. Keep in mind and be aware to stress the muscles. Your Pt would design a plan for you to improve your blood flow to your muscles. Don’t increase your running speed before your PT’s recommendations. You can continue if pain does not return. PT always designs a healing and training process from walk to run progression, for each new activity take your time as your body is in healing process and if you are going to exert pressure as you were before strain or injury it will cause more stress and take a long time to heal. Let your body adapt. For a couple of months run on the alternative days to allow for recovery and time for the body. Everyone’s recovery time can be different, as the injury caused can take more or less time to recover as compared to other patients with the same injury.  PT will help you from walk to run with some additional elliptical, cycling, swimming to mix it up during the week. Chances of reinjury are the biggest risk during or after a painful injury. Start under the guidance of your PT to lessen the risk, that will enhance the progression of running in which PT will include to give strength to previous injured tissue.

 Use your Physical Therapy Knowledge

After Rehabilitation when you come back at your home, higher chances of skipping your PT schedule and it hinders the linear progress. Always stay in contact with your Physical Therapy Center and use the plan given by your trainer. Post Rehab, keep in mind your PT is there for you even after you are discharged. Physical Therapy is important to help you get to running as soon as you can. Physical therapists by their equipment analyse the deficiencies in your running style. Therapy team will overdo for your quick recovery with specific therapy techniques. They will educate you on some key concepts for do’s and don’ts. Once or twice a weekly rehab day allows you to keep working at the cause of injury.

Live Smart

Add good habits, avoid lying on one side, get into a neutral position. Don’t look down for a long time without a break. Physical exercises are the dental floss of the running world. Stick to your prescribed physical plan. Runners already know the importance of strong glutes to control your hip rotation and prevent injury pain. Show more attention to your calves, soleus strength.

 To Get Back to Running Consider Rules- 

  • All running to be completed at liberal rate.

  • No speed work until you completely return to the Running phase.

  • Don’t run in a row of days, choose alternative days to give your body time to recover.

  •  Focus on the duration you are adding day by day.

  • Stop the discomfort and judge your each run.

  • Consider 6-8 Rehabilitation Center meetings to your PT in a month.

  • Practice Patience, Get Strong.

Contact Active Physical Therapy 

Biceps Tendinitis

Biceps Tendinitis is a common shoulder pathology which usually develops in younger athletic population due to repetitive overhead injuries. The patients suffering from this condition usually have to suffer pain, lesser range of motion & strength and impaired functional mobility. This pathology develops over the time with pain located at the front of the shoulder.

What do we mean by Biceps Tendinitis?

There are two parts of biceps muscles: the long head and the short head. The long head is usually affected with tendinitis. Biceps tendinitis is known as the inflammation of the tendon around the long head of biceps muscles. The most commonly irritated tendon is the one that attaches the top of the biceps muscles to the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis results due to the repetitive stress which in turn results into irritated, swollen and painful tendon.

What causes Biceps Tendinitis?

Excessive and abnormal forces applied across the tendon results into biceps tendinitis. Apart from this, several other conditions also contribute towards developing the condition including:

  • Tension and pulling of a tendon or muscle
  • Compression i.e. pushing, pinching or shearing
  • Weak rotator cuff and upper back muscles
  • Tight shoulder joints or muscles
  • Poor body mechanics
  • Overuse from certain types of work or sports
  • Gradual wear and tear
  • Continuous or repetitive shoulder actions
  • Abrupt increase in exercise routine
  • Age- relate bodily changes
  • Degeneration in a tendon
  • A direct injury to the shoulder.

What are the potential signs and symptoms of Biceps Tendinitis?

Biceps tendinitis is common amongst the athletes involved in swimming, throwing, gymnastics and other contact sports. Workers who are involved in overhead shoulder work or heavy lifting are at greater risk. The sufferers commonly report symptoms including:

  • Sharp pain in the front of shoulder
  • Tenderness in the front of the shoulder
  • Pain radiating towards neck down the arm
  • Feeling pain after every activity
  • Weakness around the shoulder joint
  • Catching or clicking sensation near top of the biceps
  • Pain aggravating with flexion, forearm supination or elbow flexion.

What are the Physical Treatments to treat Biceps Tendinitis?

Once you are diagnosed with Biceps Tendinitis your physical therapy will develop a customized treatment program while keeping your specific goals and condition in mind.  Your physical therapy may suggest:

  • Initially RICE; rest, ice, compression and evaluation may be suggested. He may also advice to avoid the activity aggravating the condition
  • Soft-tissue therapy, electrical stimulation or ultrasound therapy may be suggested
  • Series of stretching or strengthening exercises may be suggested to regain lost range of motion
  • Postural corrections may be suggested to correct the sitting and standing posture.
  • Physical therapists may also employ hands-on therapy to gently move or mobilize your shoulder
  • Functional training would be provided to prevent future injuries. He would point out and correct your faulty movement.

Contact Active Physical Therapy for the state-of-art treatment of any of your musculoskeletal disease. Our treatment modules are planned and coordinated according to the needs, requirements and urgencies of our patients. The treatment modules co-ordinated by us will not only cure your current ailment but also pose a check on the further ones.

Juvenile Disc Disorder

Most of the times, chronic back pain or long term back problems are associated with elderly or middle-aged people.  But Juvenile Disc Disorder can also affect the people as young as 20 years of age. It means that if you are an adolescent, even then you cannot save yourself from this deformity. The fact is; some patients may inherit a prematurely aging spine.

What do we understand by Juvenile Disc Disorder?

Juvenile Disc Disorder is a condition, where end-plates of disc spaces are not that much strong to bear the pressures generated within the disc spaces. Such a condition leads to disc herniations into the vertebral bodies and triggers back pain at quite an early age.

The condition is very much similar to that of degenerative disc disease but with a difference that in this condition, degeneration starts at a much earlier age and generally, most of the discs of lumbar spine are involved as opposed to that of degenerative disc disorder, where only one or two discs are typically involved.

What are the causes of Juvenile Disc Disorder?

Following factors can lead to Juvenile Disc Disorder:

  • Injury to back
  • Weakening of discs due to wear and tear
  • Strain and stress you put on your backs
  • Changes in your discs and other spine structures
  • Decreasing of water in the discs
  • Discs become less spongy and much thinner
  • Space between the vertebrae above and below the disc gets smaller
  • Hypermobility of facet joints
  • Your genes; you may be pre-disposed to excessive wear and tear of joints.

What are the potential signs and symptoms of Juvenile Disc Disorder?

Any part of your spine can get affected due to Juvenile Disc Disorder but low back or neck is most commonly affected parts. Other signs and symptoms of the disease include:

  • Chronic back and neck pain
  • Pain at the site of damaged disc
  • Pain radiating to another body part
  • More pain while sitting for a long time
  • Feeling of pain while bending, lifting or twisting
  • Feeling less pain while walking, running or if you change positions frequently
  • Pain subsides with rest.

What are the treatment options suggested by the Physical Therapists to treat Juvenile Disc Disorder?

Physical Therapy treatment to treat Juvenile Disc Disorder is much similar to that of Degenerative Disc Disorder. Most of the patients respond well to the physical therapy techniques and recovery is possible in about five-six weeks. Physicals therapists may suggest the following techniques to treat Juvenile Disc Disorder:

  • Physical Therapist may suggest rest or restricted activity but for few days only. Extended rest is not recommended and mild activity is suggested for better healing.
  • A daily hamstring stretching and aerobic conditioning may be suggested for the better healing
  • Deep tissue massage is recommended to release the tension in soft tissues like; ligaments, tendons or muscles
  • Heat therapy is suggested to remove the waste by-products caused due to spasms.
  • Cold therapy is used to lessen the pain and inflammation.
  • Spinal traction is administered to eliminate the pain caused due to the muscle tightness or compressed nerves.
  • Various exercises to improvise the flexibility, strength, core stability and range of motion are practised.
  • An individualized treatment program, taking into account your health and history is formulated
  • Your physical therapists will make you learn about various body mechanics to limit pain. Positions causing pain will also be made familiar to you.
  • Proper work ergonomics and posture corrections are taught to help you to take better care of your back.
  • Strengthening exercises to strengthen abdominal and back muscles are also recommended.

Juvenile Disc Disorder can wreak havoc on the back of an adolescent, so the parents should watch out for the early signs of the disease and if you find out any warning signs, should go for immediate diagnosis and treatment. Contact Active Physical Therapy for the state-of-art treatment of any of your musculoskeletal disease. Our treatment modules are planned and coordinated according to the needs, requirements and urgencies of our patients. The treatment modules co-ordinated by us will not only cure your current ailment but also pose a check on the further ones.

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is the second most common nerve compression, caused by increased pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow. The people, who repeatedly lean on their elbows or bend their elbows for sustained periods, are more likely to get affected by this condition. This condition is more common in men than women.

What do you mean by Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome affects ulnar nerve where it crosses the inside edge of the elbow. This inside edge is relatively unprotected area and ulnar nerve here is entrapped between bone and skin in the tunnel called ‘Cubital Tunnel’.  When the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel gets compressed or irritated due to an injury or pressure, it called cubital tunnel syndrome. This condition affects the Baseball Pitchers more, as the twisting motion used to throw a slider can easily damage ligaments in their elbow.

What are the common causes of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome can occur due to following possible reasons:

  • Sustained bending of elbow during sleep
  • Leaning over your elbow for longer time
  • Fluid build-up in the elbow
  • A direct blow to inside edge of the elbow
  • Previous fracture, injury or dislocation of the elbow
  • Arthritis of elbow or bone spurs
  • Any cyst near the elbow
  • Repetitive bending, twisting or flexion of elbow during painting, playing an instrument or using power tools
  • Obesity or other health conditions like hypothyroidism or diabetes

What are the potential signs and symptoms of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

Typical symptoms of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome may include:

  • Numbness and tingling sensation or intermittent pain in the elbow
  • Pain in the elbow extending to your forearm and hand
  • Weakness in hand and fingers
  • Being unable to straighten your ring and little finger
  • Tenderness in the inside edge of the elbow
  • Difficulty in gripping and holding the objects
  • Reduced ability to pinch the thumb and little finger
  • Claw-like deformity of the hand

How can physical therapy help to treat Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

Physical therapy treatment for Cubital Tunnel Syndrome includes patient education along with identification, modification and limiting the causes resulting into nerve inflammation. Apart from this, physical therapists may suggest:

  • Ergonomic considerations and changes in patterns of activities causing the condition
  • Specific elbow padding may be provided for work and leisure activities as well
  • Splinting at night may be suggested to limit range of motion enhancing the compression
  • Ulnar gliding exercises and modalities are practiced to relieve the painful symptoms
  • Modification of job activities, if needed, may be suggested
  • Therapists will suggest you different ways to rest your elbow and also educate you about the ways to use your elbow without putting any extra strain in it.
  • Heat or cold treatments may be applied to ease the pain
  • Strengthen and stretching exercises are used to strengthen the muscles of the forearm
  • Range-of-motion exercises are used to help you to return full length of muscles that are shortened due to protective posturing

Contact Active Physical Therapy for the state-of-art treatment of any of your musculoskeletal problems. Our certified ad dedicated physical therapists design individualized treatment plans depending upon your condition and problem.

Radial Tunnel Syndrome

What do we mean by Radial Tunnel Syndrome? What are its potential causes, symptoms and treatment options?

Radial Tunnel Syndrome 1Most of the athletes visit physical therapists for their lateral elbow pain. Physical therapists are of the view that Radial Tunnel Syndrome (RTS) occurs due to swelling or irritation of radial nerve because of the friction caused due to compression by muscles.

What do you mean by Radial Tunnel Syndrome?

Radial Tunnel Syndrome occurs when the radial nerve gets compressed where it passes through a tunnel near the elbow. This compression happens in proximal forearm where the radial nerve splits into PIN (main trunk) and sensory branch (minor trunk).

What are the causes of Radial Tunnel Syndrome (RTS)?

Pain of Radial Tunnel Syndrome occurs due to the pressure on radial nerve. Other causes of Radial Tunnel Syndrome include:

  • Injury
  • Bone Tumors
  • Inflammation/Swelling of surrounding tissues
  • Non-cancerous fatty-tumors
  • Too Small tunnel
  • Repetitive bending, gripping and pinching of wrist
  • Direct blow to the outside of elbow
  • Continuous twisting of arm

What are the potential symptoms of Radial Tunnel Syndrome (RTS)?

The symptoms of Radial Tunnel Syndrome start getting worse when you bend your wrist backward or hold an object with a stiff wrist. Following are the symptoms of Radial Tunnel Syndrome:

  • Tenderness and pain on the outside of elbow
  • Pain in the forearm and hand during activity
  • Minimized grip and forearm strength
  • Pain that worsens while rotating wrist
  • Cutting and stabbing pain at top of the forearm or at the back of hand, when you straighten your fingers
  • Numbness and tingling down the forearm

How can Physical Therapy be helpful to treat Radial Tunnel Syndrome (RTS)?

Fore mostly, the physical therapist will advise you to avoid the repetitive activities which involve your wrists. If Radial Tunnel Syndrome is caused due to your work site conditions, your work site conditions would be modified. Apart from these, following therapeutic techniques would be administered to treat the condition:

  • Stretching and strengthening exercises would be administered to reduce pain
  • Cold and heat therapies would be practiced
  • Range of motion exercises would be administered to restore tissue flexibility and normal functioning of the joints
  • You would be advised to wear night-splint to limit your elbow movements at night
  • Soft –tissue massage would be used to promote blood circulation
  • Modalities like ultrasound, moist heat and electrical stimulation may also be used
  • Spinal manual therapy may be used to improve neural mobility
  • Ergonomic interventions like; load management, postural awareness and workstation modification are used
  • Functional strengthening exercises are used to treat Radial Tunnel Syndrome

 Contact   Active Physical Therapy for the state-of-art treatment of your overuse injuries. Our certified and skilled physical therapists are always ready to help you with customized treatment plans as per your needs and requirements.

What is Little League Shoulder and How is Physical Therapy Beneficial to Treat the Problem?

Little Leaguer's Shoulder Little League Shoulder also referred to as Pitcher’s Shoulder or Throwing Shoulder is a type of overuse injury; commonly affecting gymnasts, pitchers and young athletes lying in the age group of 10 to 15 years. Under this condition, the shoulder pain intensifies with the stressful use of arm.

What do we mean by Little League Shoulder?

Little League Shoulder is an injury to the proximal growth plate at the upper end of the humerus at the shoulder. The growth plate is a part of the bone that grows actively as a person matures. If not treated properly, it can cause disruption in the normal bone growth. The injury to the growth plate occurs due to repetitive throwing and overhead movements of the shoulder. Children who participate actively in baseball the whole year around are more likely to be affected by this injury.

How can Physical Therapy help your child to relieve the symptoms of Little League Shoulder?

As throwing and reaching are completely bodily activities and moreover the Little-League injury is a musculoskeletal injury; advanced Physical Therapy modalities can best treat this dysfunctional problem. Physical Therapy targets at restoring the strength, function, mobility and stability to the injured player’s shoulder before he returns to his usual sports’ activities. Following treatment options may be adopted by the Physical Therapists to help the young athletes to relieve Little League Shoulder:

  • Initially, physical therapists will prescribe rest, ice and compression to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Any of the sports’ activities of the child will be restricted for 2 to 3 months or as required.
  • Corrective Therapies will be administered to correct those mechanical faults that are causing stress to the shoulder.
  • Strengthening exercises will be suggested to restore strength and function to the muscles in elbow, shoulder, upper back and shoulder blades.
  • Soft tissue massage and Joint mobilization techniques will be employed by the physical therapists to lessen the pain and as well as tendon irritation. These modalities also help to restore normal joint mechanics.
  •  Modalities such as Ultrasound, Electrical Stimulation, Laser and Cold techniques will be used to enhance motion and to lessen the inflammation of shoulder joint and surrounding tendons’ muscles.
  • Posterior Shoulder Capsule stretches will be prescribed to enhance the flexibility of shoulder muscles.
  • Neuromuscular Re-education program; including the progressive throwing program is introduced to improve movement techniques and mechanics of the players.
  • Once the player is ready to return to the normal sports’ activities; physical therapists will educate him about correct warm-up techniques, throwing mechanic, pitch count and cool-down techniques.

Active Physical Therapy provides prompt Sports Rehabilitation Physical Therapy in one-on-one setting for the active athletes and players. Our diligent and compassionate physical therapists help the athletes to get back to their sports’ activities as more vigorous and better than before.

Patellar Tendinitis

 

Patellar Tendinitis: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

The patellar tendon is the one connecting the knee cap to the shin bone. Like other tendons; this tendon as well is made up of hard string like bands. Patellar Tendonitis is an overuse injury resulting from constant strain to patellar tendon.

What do you mean by Patellar Tendinitis?

Patellar Tendinitis also known as Jumper’s Knee is a condition where tendon attaching the patella or knee cap to the top of the shin bone or tibia becomes inflamed, irritated and painful. This condition is more common among the athletes, whose sports involve frequent running, jumping and landing activities like basket ball or volley ball players.

What are the potential signs and symptoms of Patellar Tendinitis?

Pain over the patellar tendon is the initial and noticeable sign of Patellar Tendinitis. Other than this, following symptoms can be noticed in the patients suffering from Patellar Tendinitis:

  • Tender and Swollen tendon
  • Crunching sensation (Crepitus) during the knee movement
  • Feeling pain while jumping or kneeling down
  • Pain while beginning a physical activity
  • Feeling pain while climbing stairs or getting up from a chair
  • Swelling in and around the patellar region
  • Feeling pain while contracting the quadriceps muscles
  • Affected tendon feels thickened than the unaffected one

What are the causes of Patellar Tendinitis?

Patellar Tendinitis is an overuse injury and below mentioned factors contribute towards it:

  • Repeated stress to the patellar tendon
  • Weakening of the tendon structure
  • Repeated stress  to the  supporting structure of knee
  • Inappropriate foot wears
  • Inadequate training techniques
  • Running on the hard surfaces
  • Age
  • Joint laxity and flexibility
  • Misalignment of leg, foot and ankle
  • Flat foot
  • Leg length difference

How Physical Therapy can help to treat Patellar Tendinitis?

Your Physical Therapists will start a proper treatment regime after diagnosing and evaluating your condition properly. The treatment therapies developed usually depend upon the extent and severity of the injury. Therapists may suggest following treatment techniques:

  • Therapists may suggest you to avoid the activities aggravating your condition
  • Eccentric and Concentric program of exercises is designed to treat Patellar Tendinitis. These are the most helpful therapeutic exercises to treat the condition.
  • Splints may be used to immobilize your joint for a short period of time
  • Cold therapy is administered to reduce pain and inflammation
  • A Jumper’s Knee strap may be used by the therapists to lessen the pain and to reduce the pressure on the tendon
  • Stretching exercises may be prescribed to lessen the muscle spam and to lengthen the muscle tendon
  • Strengthening exercises are administered to strengthen the weak thigh muscles
  • Iontophoresis therapy may be used by the therapists
  • Electrical Simulation and Ultrasound may be used to limit and control swelling and pain
  • Flexibility exercises are developed for thigh and calf muscles and to maximize the control and strength of quadriceps muscles
  • Therapists may also design special shoe inserts to improvise the knee alignment and the functioning of patella

Contact Active Physical Therapy for the efficient and state of art treatment of your musculoskeletal problems and disorders. Our certified and acknowledged therapist use patient proven treatment techniques to heal your ailments and to make you as staunch and sturdy as before.

Hammer Toe

Hammer Toe: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Hammer Toe

Hammer toe also referred to as Claw Toe is the toe with an inappropriate shape. The toe next to the big toe is the most affected one. This deformity most commonly affects the women wearing high heeled shoes or shoes with narrow toe box.

What do we mean by Hammer Toe?

Hammer Toe is a condition where a bend develops at the joint between the first and second segment of one or more small toes and as a result of which the tip of the toe bends downwards giving it a hammer or claw like shape. Due to the joints of the toe bulging out, the person may have trouble walking. It can turn out to be more serious in the persons with diabetes and poor circulation.

What are the potential causes of Hammer Toe?

Each toe’s muscles work in pairs and whenever there is a muscular imbalance; pressure on the joints and tendons of toe increases and thus toe assumes a hammer head shape. This muscular imbalance occurs due to the following reasons:

  • Poor or ill-fitted shoes including too tight, too short, too pointy and high heeled shoes
  • Foot Structure problem since birth
  • Arthritis
  • Poor blood flow to foot
  • Peripheral Neuropathy (having little or no feeling) in case of diabetic patients
  • Injury to toes
  • Genes also contribute towards developing this condition like flat foot or high arched foot
  • Tight foot ligaments or tendons
  • Spinal cord or peripheral nerve damage

What are the signs and symptoms of Hammer Toe?

Hammer Toe causes you pain and discomfort while walking. Its symptoms may include:

  • A downward bent toe
  • Callus on the sole and corn on the toe of the foot
  • Inability to flex your foot or wiggle your toes
  • Pain while putting a shoe
  • Swelled and red colored toe joint
  • Pain on the ball of the foot
  • Cramping in a toe

What are the treatment options available to treat Hammer Toe?

Treatments are advised according to the severity of your condition. Following treatment options are suggested to treat hammer Toe:

  • Therapists may advice to wear customized toe pads or insoles in your shoes to relieve pain
  • Customized cushions and pads are prescribed to treat bunions and corns
  • Gentle Stretching exercises and Massaging may be recommended to relieve pain and as well to re-position the affected toe.
  • Ice packs are applied to treat painful swelling
  • Exercises are prescribed to restore muscular imbalance
  • Foot exercises are recommended to relax tight foot tendons
  • Manipulation and Splinting of the affected toe is prescribed
  • Exercises to stretch and strengthen the toe muscles are prescribed

Contact Active Physical Therapy for the customized treatment of any of your musculoskeletal deformities and pathologies. Our skilful and dexterous therapists craft out well coordinated and personalized treatment modules to help you to return to your normal activities as early as possible.

Sinus Tarsi Syndrome

Sinus Tarsi Syndrome

Sinus Tarsi Syndrome: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Sinus Tarsi Syndrome (STS) is a type of foot pathology, resulting either from the traumatic injury or recurrent injuries or sprain to the ankle during running or walking on a flat foot. It mostly hits athletes or dancers whose professions require a lot of jumping, sudden or quick movements and sudden stops.

 What do we mean by Sinus Tarsi Syndrome (STS)?

The word ‘sinus’ commonly refers to cavity in the bone. The cavity, Sinus Tarsi, is a small cylindrical cavity outside the ankle between the talus and calcaneous bones. Swelling around the Sinus Tarsi region or injury to any of the surrounding ligaments results in Sinus Tarsi Syndrome.

What are the common symptoms associated with Sinus Tarsi Syndrome?

Symptoms related with Sinus Tarsi Syndrome arise gradually over a period of time. Its symptoms are worse during morning but start improving as you warm up. Its symptoms include:

  • Sharp and pinching pain at the top and/or outer side of foot and ankle
  • Pain worsens during the activities like; walking or jumping
  • Stiffness in the ankle
  • Instability is felt while walking or running on uneven ground or slopes and during jumping or changing directions
  • Sinus Tarsi region may be felt tender when touched
  • Pain during ankle movements; especially when you move the sole of foot inwards or downwards
  • Pain intensifies with weight-bearing

What are the causes of Sinus Tarsi Syndrome?

The exact reason of Sinus Tarsi Syndrome is still a matter of debate. Trauma to the ankle is considered to be the most common cause of this pathological condition. Other than this, below mentioned factors give arise to Sinus Tarsi Syndrome:

  • An inversion injury to the foot that is not treated properly
  • Over growth of nerve or fat tissues in the cavity
  • Deviations in bone structures
  • Bone Spurs
  • Arthritis and Bone bridges
  • Ganglion Cysts
  • Foot Deformities (like Flat Foot)
  • Sitting with your feet tucked under you
  • Poor foot Bio-mechanics
  • Inappropriate Footwear
  • Poor flexibility and muscle weakness

How can Sinus Tarsi Syndrome be treated?

Physical Therapy treatment under the guidance and surveillance of expert Physical Therapist is the best treatment option available to treat Sinus Tarsi Syndrome. Therapeutic techniques employed by Physical Therapists not only speed up the recovery but also reduce the chances of recurrence. A complete Physical Therapy Treatment plan consists of:

  • Initially, RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) therapy is advised to to reduce and eliminate pain and to help tissues to heal
  • Activity triggering pain and swelling is identified and eliminated to reduce muscle tension
  • Stable shoes, an ankle sleeve or brace and over the counter or special orthotics are recommended
  • Electrotherapy, laser therapy and cryotherapy is employed

After the pain and swelling are subsided, physical therapists perform following exercises to enable the patient to return to normal activities:

  • Joint mobilisation exercises  are performed to reduce stiffness
  • Stretching exercises including; calf stretches and strengthening exercises are performed
  • Balance Training is provided to prevent  instability
  • Bio-mechanical correction is advised
  • Flexion exercises are administered to strengthen the muscles

 Contact Active Physical Therapy for the state-of-art and effective treatment of any of your musculoskeletal problem and disorders. Our proficient physical therapists create and develop customized treatment plans while taking into view your needs and urgencies.